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ianrudy

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Reply with quote  #1 
So as I continue my personal coaching journey one of things I've been doing lately is going back through some of the archives and re-watching/re-reading things as I've gained a new perspective and lens.  One thing that had a pretty powerful impact and connected dots for me was this session by Miguel Cardoso on Offensive and Defensive Transitions - The thing that stuck with me and made me think wasn't just the focus on transitions but on the building a very specific style of play from the ground up through everything we do as coaches.  It was the specificity and attention to detail that really got me thinking and finally putting into words and writing my own tactical philosophy and style of play.  I've always had a vision of how I want my teams to play and have organized sessions around it but I loved using the 4 moments as the organization and the detail of incorporating that as the true theme of the session.

To that end.. I need some stimulus from this esteemed audience as my struggle is always the offensive side of the game (goalkeeper by trade and have had to really work the attacking side in my coaching development).

Here is what I want as a game principle:  I want my team to exercise patience and control the ball (maintain possession) looking to find and create open spaces to attack and when those spaces occur attack them quickly and overload those areas.

So I'm looking for technical and tactical SSGs that help bring out moments for teams to exercise that patience but when that opportunity to attack occurs they can do so and overload that area.  So yes I'm thinking that constant probing that Barcelona does but then quickly attacks and overloads the space with numbers and always as that free man option.  I know what the end picture looks like.. need some ways to build up to it.

So thoughts I have are begin with the building the attack and maintaining possession switching the fields and learning how the ball movement causes the defense to change shape and create spaces for us to attack.  Movement and position rotation also creating space and opportunities for overloads so overlapping on the wing or even under lapping.  One of the principles we have already on attack is to involve one fullback into the attack and for wingers to look to cut inside and create that space for the fullback to run into.  I also have and want to produce dribblers so we have that to unbalance the defense and create space and opportunities as well.  Having others look for at the space created by teammates dribbling and beating defenders and use it to create those overloads is key as well.  I think I'm struggling the most with the patience part of it and teaching that collective "moment when it's on" and more specifically how to manipulate the training environment to bring that out.

Welcome any nudges in the right direction or complete extractions of head from arse you can provide!
coachkev

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Reply with quote  #2 

ian. the single most important thing I learned fairly early in my coaching life was that EVERYTHING focused around the BALL and the PLAYER
Everything else is the interaction between these two elements....EVERYTHING!
Once I figured that out, my coaching decisions became more focused on what players could DO and not necessarily on what they COULDN'T do

WHO has the ball?
WHERE are the players not with the ball?
WHAT are you trying to DO with the ball?

Then its AT the Ball (technique), NEAR the ball (support play) and finally AWAY from the ball (the BIG picture)
Keeping things to the key of 3 is a known way for motor skills to store information to use.
Match tactics can then be condensed down to GET the ball...GET it forward as fast and as safely as possible...GET a strike on the opponents goal

Transition therefore is replaced by WHAT do I do when WE have the ball & WHAT do I do when we HAVEN'T the ball?
Younger players understood better what was happening and more importantly, what to DO about it.

Some SSGs that work are:
6 SECONDS (on possession, you have six seconds to get a strike in on the opponents goal - it leaves the decision making to the players. THEY know that if they complete 2 1 touch passes but the receiving player for the 3rd pass controls it instead of passing, then it goes back to 0
3 & GO (on possession, complete 3 1 touch passes before going for goal
6 SECONDS2 (opposite to 6 second SSG - when possession is lost, the team have 6 seconds to regain possession or goal to opponents no matter if they score another goal

mbiyenm

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianrudy
I know what the end picture looks like.. need some ways to build up to it.

Another method is to show the end picture first.   Then ask them for ways to recreate the picture.  Patience should simply be a tool to create the end picture.  So how do you move the ball/players so the defense has a dilemma to which they will give the wrong answer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ianrudy
Here is what I want as a game principle:  I want my team to exercise patience and control the ball (maintain possession) looking to find and create open spaces to attack and when those spaces occur attack them quickly and overload those areas.

Start with a specific game situation.  The ball and player movements are tools to move the defense into the situation you desire.
A simple example: give and go [same idea for more complex situations]
1. Show the 2v1 being performed (in slow motion) so every one sees the picture as you do.  
2. Tactical objective: The ball and players movement cause the defender to be unable to both pressure the ball and block the pass. (pressure the ball=ball carrier looks down at the ball)
3. Overloaded game challenge: create situations where a defender cannot both pressure the ball and block the forward pass.  Patience=do not initiate give and go until defender is out of position
4. Insight: which movements of the ball/player causes the defender to be out of position? coachKev set of questions above are an excellent guide.
5. even number game challenge: recreate the tactical situation


ianrudy

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Posts: 54
Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks guys that got me going.  I don't think I really understood 3 & go or 1-2-3 as you used to call it in Match Day until this thread.. and I mean really understood how powerful it can be.

Quote:
4. Insight: which movements of the ball/player causes the defender to be out of position? coachKev set of questions above are an excellent guide.


Peeling the onion it really is cool how you gain more and more awareness as you go in your development.  I get that from my other professional field (technology) but those times of banging your head against the wall turn to times of feeling like a kid in a candy store.

Thanks!
Ian
craigl

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianrudy

So I'm looking for technical and tactical SSGs that help bring out moments for teams to exercise that patience but when that opportunity to attack occurs they can do so and overload that area.  So yes I'm thinking that constant probing that Barcelona does but then quickly attacks and overloads the space with numbers and always as that free man option.  I know what the end picture looks like.. need some ways to build up to it.


I'm not sure if this will help but I'll give it a go.

To me, they need to be able to see the moment where the opportunity is present.   So, from a big picture I progress many aspects before they are at the moment you describe.

First, how to beat a player 1v1 and how to score goals in many different situations.  (In basketball they do lots of lay ups as it is an easy basket on a fast break.  I find it odd when soccer coaches don't teach kids how to score the easy types of goals).  1v1 is different situations face to face, side to side, defender on back.  The players need to have good ball feel for controlling the ball with out having to look at it all the time.  They need to know different turns and moves and fakes and when to use them.

Then, 2v1.  With 2v1 the Brazilians see the first method as the overlap.  The overlap can come on the outside or the inside.   The overlaping run can cause a defender to hesitate which means he may be beat on the dribble or with the pass.   In addition to the overlap, there are takeovers, give and goes, penetrating passes, and double passes.   There are many drills to develop 2v1 and 1v1 skills.  Some of these need to be break away situations.  Others involve playing out of tight space.    When the players know the different combinations and they know how to read the dribblers movements so that they know what combination is in play.

Then there are 3v2.  With 3v2 you try to create a 2v1 situation.   I start this with 3 man weave patterns.   Switching the field and being able to hit long passes/crosses.  Short-Short-Long Patterns.   Combination plays into the corners for crosses that get finished.   Here the third player needs to know not just the ball, but the movement of the 2nd player.   When we get to this phase, initially the two off ball players sometimes try to make the same run rather than reading the broader situation.

Next is 5v4 on a half field and a keeper.   Here is where your attackers have the other team in their own third and the try to create the situations that you mention.  Often they switch the ball from side to side looking to spread out the defense or create a gap to expose.   You can work with the back line deep or higher.   They need to see where the space is to attack.   They need to be prepared for the different ways that teams defend.

With this 5v4 you need to know how your defense is to play when they win the ball.   Do they look for the quick counter to 2 counter attack goals?  Do the forwards press when they lose the ball? or do they drop?

Other teams may press or may drop and give you lots of time to bring the ball up.   So your players need to be prepared for the game situations.

There are games that can help teach the mid-field possession/buildup.  You have field in thirds with keepers.  There are different variations.  This is something to work on as well.

I am trying to paint the big picture.  Still, you need to have some competence with 1v1 before 2v1.   You need 2v1 before 3v2.   You start to understand 3v2 it prepares you for 5v4.   Then you start to read the bigger game and adjust to different circumstances.   When all the players share these understandings you start to see good soccer ideas.   The soccer ideas is the most important thing.  Then they learn to do it better and they can continue to polish it into good soccer.

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