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Walrus

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So im watching some basketball on TV and noticed some teams playing full court man to man, some playing a trapping defence when teams cross center.  In hockey you have what is called a " left wing lock" it's basically a zone trap for teams that aren't that great hoping opponents will turn the puck over a mid ice.  So it got me thinking.  What is the equivalent of that in soccer?  I mean, you cant always press very high because good teams will find a way around it, or in the younger age groups, the big strong defender with a big boot will boot it down the field to that one quick forward who is generally be 1vs 1 with your keeper and score.  I guess my question would be?  In soccer, what is equal to a trap like in basketball or hockey that i just mentioned?
everything

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something like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTuTegVp2vc

play is on one side.
one player tries to force play on that side.
another tries to block passing lane.
first try to intercept.
if the pass is complete, press from 3 directions.
 
Walrus

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This is excellent.  Thanks
everything

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you've got me wondering if my 6v6 indoor team can apply the 1-3-1 neutral zone trap from hockey. I kinda think we could pull it off at times, since we naturally already do sometimes without any forethought.
coachola7520

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Pressing very in football takes a high nitro energy from the players as a team but High press without proper approach will end your team going on counter attack. There zones on the soccer pitch that needs lots of understanding. Pressing in attack, pressing in mid and pressing in [comp][comp]defense. All this need proper session program and players mental approach rather than going on press with dark glasses on their face.
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coachkev

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Pressing is a state of mind NOT just a tactic
If only one or two do it then its wasted
Press too high and you are vunerable to the over mid through ball
Press too low and you are vunerable to the talented dribbling opponent

The BIG problem is that most players dont realise the importance of moving AS the ball is moving to the opponent and the press only starts when the opponent has received the ball - thats WAY too late.
True pressure is movement towards the opponent likely to receive BEFORE the ball is played.
This makes receivers play earlier than they wanted to, or even make a mistake on the reception of the pass

Brianm

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Reply with quote  #7 
Good advice Kev.
coachola7520

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Reply with quote  #8 
Great light Coach Kev..
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Goal150

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walrus
So im watching some basketball on TV and noticed some teams playing full court man to man, some playing a trapping defence when teams cross center.  In hockey you have what is called a " left wing lock" it's basically a zone trap for teams that aren't that great hoping opponents will turn the puck over a mid ice.  So it got me thinking.  What is the equivalent of that in soccer?  I mean, you cant always press very high because good teams will find a way around it, or in the younger age groups, the big strong defender with a big boot will boot it down the field to that one quick forward who is generally be 1vs 1 with your keeper and score.  I guess my question would be?  In soccer, what is equal to a trap like in basketball or hockey that i just mentioned?


Most teams press, involves just pressuring the ball. I feel there is certainly a trap moment.

What do we tell our young defenders when building out of the back? "Be careful if you pass across the face of goal?" or "Don't dwell on the ball too long in front of goal."

For me, thats the trap. Body shape of pressers, angle/curvature of approach to force the ball back in front of the goal. This also involves delaying the pressure on the #4,5, or 1—until, as Kev says, the ball is in transit to them. But then you close fast, prevent them from picking their head up. 

One team we played used to drop to their GK and switch to the opposite. We keyed on that. Once we saw one FB shape to drop to the keeper we would get tight on the opposite FB (not giving the GK the switch opportunity) but time it so he wouldn't get clued to it too early and pass elsewhere. As soon as the ball was in transit to GK, our #9 would press and direct play to the opposite side the ball came but now the option wasn't there. 

We scored 2 goals from this tactic. It forced them to abandon it, which threw their build out game out the window. We won the game easily. It was a good team too, that possessed it very well. 
craigl

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Reply with quote  #10 
Atlanta United FC was a new team in MLS last year.

Early in the season Alec Kann was the keeper.  I like him as a keeper.  He is very good with his feet like a field player.   Other teams, would presses and Atlanta would continue to build up out of trouble.  It was often a high level of skillful play right in front of their goal.

After Guzan showed up, he was not as good with the short passing game.  Even this season, Guzan seems to be improving his touch and ability to switch the ball more quickly.  However, Guzan, recognizes the moment and has the ability to play a very good long pass that Kann did not have.   Now, Atlanta does not get pressed as much.   I think Guzan reads the overall game better.  He is a bit more athletic with saves.   I wish he would guess a little less with Pks, but he is great keeper and I am happy to see him with Atlanta.

Guzan is more comfortable with his left foot and you see it impact how teams press.   He can hit passes with his right, but he seems more comfortable with this left.

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