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Lucky614

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Reply with quote  #1 
I know there are different views on this. On my current team I have kids that can do 10, and two kids that can do over two hundred. We are considered a premeire club. I am wondering what your thoughts are on this?
MrSoccer

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Reply with quote  #2 
Juggling gives a player a better ball touch that is important. Get a high ball on the run one touch you control it second touch you score if you are within your distance.

No ball touch you can screw up the first touch your not scoring on the second. Then you run out of time and space.

Go to a try out can't juggle you look sloppy and less killed. That might be enough for a coach not to pick you.

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coachkev

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Reply with quote  #3 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky614
I know there are different views on this. On my current team I have kids that can do 10, and two kids that can do over two hundred. We are considered a premeire club. I am wondering what your thoughts are on this?

Plan this out: Draw a large circle and inside write in capitals: CONTROL
From that you draw spiderlines for ALL other techniques as CONTROL is what drives ALL techniques.

CONTROL has various elements that combine to create the performance
* RECEIVING THE BALL- FROM ANY HEIGHT/ANGLE/SPEED
* RELEASING THE BALL - PASSING/HEADING/CROSSING BOTH FEET TO TARGET
* RUNNING WITH THE BALL AT SPEED -CONBINING BOTH FEET
* RETAINING POSSESSION

So juggling develops CONTROL then the DECISION MAKING to use it correctly.

For me, Juggling develops the Touch Skills needed to control a ball played in the air

mbiyenm

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Reply with quote  #4 
Important.  200 touches may be a sign of good endurance.  However, 10 to 20 should be within reach of any player to demonstrate some control.
newsocdad

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Reply with quote  #5 
I am a late comer to the importance of juggling.  While not perfect, I think the reality is that it is a very good way to improve a player's touch and it is something that is easy to work on and they can do it by themselves. 

A ball and a wall is also good, but not always available, and my kids have preferred what we call "standing in a corner".  Good to do in a gym.  Kid stands facing the corner about 4-5 feet away and hits controlled balls into the corner walls.  You get different bounces if you screw up, and you can work on sequences.

I think the old adage is probably true -- Not every good juggler is a good soccer player, but every good soccer player is a good juggler. 
Oldtimer

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Reply with quote  #6 
Juggling makes every touch better.

See post #5 here for a progression/process that works.

https://andagain.websitetoolbox.com/post/juggling-the-soccer-ball-for-u12-girls-6867848?highlight=juggling+progression&pid=1282568562

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WillieB

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Reply with quote  #7 
I believe it is useful as it helps a player to control a ball and is also good for their co-ordination however only if they are using different parts of the body/foot and also putting varying height on the ball.  The guys who can do 10, are the first few good?  If so that's all that's needed as you want then getting the ball under control in a game on their first touch, 2nd at most, definitely not touch 200.
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coachkev

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Reply with quote  #8 
Willie......remembering Jinky Johnstone eh?? [thumb]
WillieB

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by coachkev
Willie......remembering Jinky Johnstone eh?? [thumb]


I was thinking Jim Baxter, Wembley 1967 playing keepie uppie against some team who won the WC the previous year.  Now that's what you call taking the piss

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coachkev

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Reply with quote  #10 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillieB
Quote:
Originally Posted by coachkev
Willie......remembering Jinky Johnstone eh?? [thumb]


I was thinking Jim Baxter, Wembley 1967 playing keepie uppie against some team who won the WC the previous year.  Now that's what you call taking the piss

Can't argue with a 2-3 Willie [frown][biggrin] but you think a Rangers player tops Celtics wee jinky then??

By the way what happened to Jim Baxter....did the demon drink get him?

WillieB

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by coachkev

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillieB
Quote:
Originally Posted by coachkev
Willie......remembering Jinky Johnstone eh?? [thumb]


I was thinking Jim Baxter, Wembley 1967 playing keepie uppie against some team who won the WC the previous year.  Now that's what you call taking the piss

Can't argue with a 2-3 Willie [frown][biggrin] but you think a Rangers player tops Celtics wee jinky then??

By the way what happened to Jim Baxter....did the demon drink get him?



Both different types of player however wee Jinky was something else.  We talk a lot about possession football and when we do it tends to be keeping possession by passing.  in those days the way Celtic kept possession was by giving the ball to Jinky who would take it for a run around the pitch and let his teammates get a rest,

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Maddog

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Reply with quote  #12 
It is all about learning to control ones body and developing touch on balls that come from all angles and heights with varying pace. Important absolutely but I agree player should be able to get 10-20 touches regularly to be an effective player. More is nice but not absolutely critical. 
MrSoccer

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Reply with quote  #13 
I think it was in the Wc that Italy won maybe in 1982 if that was the year Italy won. That year they just had a lot better control of the ball then everybody else.
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Lucky614

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Reply with quote  #14 
Good point Maddog, anyone else agree, or disagree with the point about being able to do at least 10-20 juggles?
coachkev

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Reply with quote  #15 

I remember learning the Football de Salao (Brazillian Futsal) and I asked one of the coaches why the importance of juggling.
He said the easy answer was that not everyone could juggle, but EVERY top soccer player CAN juggle.

BobC

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Reply with quote  #16 
I look at this differently than some other coaches. To me, the ability to juggle is all well and fine, but in some cases is kind of gimmicky. Some players I have coached can juggle pretty well, others seem to have some kind of mental block or confidence thing about it, and they struggle to do even 10. However, some of those same players are terrific all-around players.

A couple of girls on my current team have a hard time juggling even 10, but over their last couple of years their first touch and overall ball control has improved tremendously. One of the girls plays in the back. Five years ago she started out pretty basic, and has turned into a fabulous player. She can catch balls with her feet out of the air, and her first touch has gotten really good. I really couldn't care less that she can't "juggle".

It's a "nice to have" skill, but not a deal-breaker for me.

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coachkev

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Reply with quote  #17 

Bob,
The FIRST skill ANY player needs is CONTROL of the ball (receiving)
Then MOVING the ball (running with the ball)
Then PLAYING the ball (passing/releasing)
Then STRIKING the ball (crossing/shooting/corners/free kick/penalty)
Then HEADING the ball (defensive/offensive)

So, if we now see where juggling is in terms of importance to a player, you will see that juggling is a prime skill to enhance...
control, moving the ball, playing the ball, striking the ball, and heading the ball.
Now as coaches unless we are convinced of the sequence then we will not be able to convince our players that juggling is a necessary skill to master so they can play the game better and have more time with the ball.

 

BobC

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Reply with quote  #18 
I don't think you understood a word I just said.
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coachkev

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Reply with quote  #19 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobC
I don't think you understood a word I just said.

Funny, thats EXACTLY what I was going to reply to YOU Bob [biggrin]

Its all semantics Bob in the end isn't it?......its what each coach believes in.
I just commented on that I used to be anti juggling but was persuaded by a Brazillian coach who gave a winning arguement for players to be able to juggle well thats all.

You have a differing opinion and so from your perspective what you believe in you stated.....doesn't mean you are right or wrong, likewise, it doesnt mean I'M right or wrong.

But hey, the world doesn't stop because we don't agree eh? [thumb]

everything

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Reply with quote  #20 
Lucky, what is your opinion? Also, what do you think of learning a few basic tricks?

Even on a rec team we followed a bit of the progression Oldtimer listed and everyone enjoyed it and improved first touch and aerial control and comfort. At our low level, 10 was fine and achievable and helpful. We didn't need or have time to go too far with a few notable exceptions. However, there's no way one can strive toward the insane control of a Messi or Iniesta and not also have good juggling. If anyone ever wants more inspiration on this topic I show them a video like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GepGIPcd5k (Messi Xavi Iniesta Magical Ball Controls). Messi's first touch receiving ball at any angle, ground or air, puts the ball in the ideal space (not necessarily dead). Taking a ball out of the air from any angle and weight and redirecting it with 1-2 touches into the corner of the net or other precise location (including ground passes and shots) while evading defenders takes some great control. That's all from a team that supposedly wants the ball on the deck as much as possible.

Juggling is a prereq but likely not sufficient for those game application skills, so the question I have is when should the progression be to receiving and redirecting in more varied angles, etc.? Lots of people have probably seen the Bayern "bucket ball" vid: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAIsib9ed7I so yet another world class team with lots of World Cup winners under a legendary coach is working on juggling type skills.
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